waist, waste

waist, waste

By LAWRENCE FELLOWS

You may think that what you see in the mirror these days is more waste than waist. But there is no waste in the sense of something lost or diminished, apart from your figure. The words have the same Teutonic roots, as does wax, which means “to grow.”

The waist is so named because, sooner or later, after all that good food, it’s the place where the body begins to grow again.

 

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The Writer's Stylebook is a unique collaboration between two former journalists -- my father, Lawrence, and me. Mr. Fellows, an impassioned wordsmith and journalist of long standing, created the original Stylebook, which he distributed to Connecticut newspapers and worked on for over a decade until his death 16 years ago. In 2003, the Connecticut Press Club published "Wordwatch: A Writer's Guide to Linguistic Distinctions," a compendium of nearly 300 of my father's word features. Unfortunately, that book is out of print and my father's features have been languishing in the attic of our family home in Westport -- until now. With the blessing of my mother, Ruth, I'm reviving the Stylebook and putting it online in the hope that it will find new readers. I think there's a need for a lively, illustrated guide to words and word usages that isn't wordy -- especially in today's fast-paced world!

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